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Consumer Alert: Misleading ads for local florists

Brides & blooms: Local florists offer advice on what to choose for your wedding

Florists Warn of Web Impostors

For Valentine's Day - Local Florists Deliver Roses and Flowers

For Valentine's Day - Real Men Do Like Flowers

Don't forget the flowers By Anne Cron

The $100 Posy Race By John Leland

New Jersey Floral Network - Deceptive Advertising Lawsuit in Delaware

Dateline reports: Finding a Local Florist

FTC Alert: Petal Pushers!

Lucky Bamboo becomes trend in U.S.

http://www.sharpman.com/Article.asp?ArticleID=505


What the Color of Roses mean

Flowers and Their Month

Wedding and Anniversary Gifts


Tip of the month:

January

Types of interior plants

Indoor plants, also called houseplants, are divided into four categories

Foliage Plants- also called green plants prefer indirect lighting, moist soil but not wet,and temperatures between 65 to 80 degrees

Flowering Plants-also called blooming plants are usually purchased mature and already blooming. Most blooming plants are not suited for continued indoor living and should be moved outdoors after blooming

Cacti- very tolerant plants prefer a sunny window, highly porous well-drained soil, watering occasionally. Cacti do not have leaves

Succulents- succulents are similar to cacti, storing water in their stems and leaves. Succulents prefer porous well-drained soil, lots of sun, good air circulation and plenty of water. During the winter, succulents must go dormant in a cool, dry environment.

February

Roses

Proper care of cut roses can double their life.

The key to doubling the vase life of roses is to insure that the roses get plenty of water. If the roses are in a foam oasis, make sure the foam is always dripping wet. Avoid using a home or commercial water softener as the salts can cause premature wilting. Air bubbles or bacteria can clog the stem and prevent water from reaching the rose. This causes the rose head to droop. You can prevent or eliminate stem blockages by cutting the rose stems under water. Fill your sink or a bucket with water then submerge your clippers or knife in the water and cut at least one inch off the bottom of the stem. Immediately place the roses in a vase, making sure to remove any leaves below the water line. Leaves in the water will decay and provide a breeding ground for bacteria that can clog the stem.

If the water turns cloudy, replace it with clean water, with floral preservative added. The preservative does three things: prevents bacteria from growing, lowers the PH of the water making it flow into the roses more easier, and provides food (sugar) for the roses to keep them from fading. Sometimes you can revive roses that have drooped by recutting the stems under water. Some experts recommend soaking the entire rose (stem plus flower) in a tub of water for an hour. Roses will last longer if displayed in a cool area. Keep them out of the sun and away from any heat sources and drafts.

If your roses are delivered in a box, keep them in a cool dark place until they can be arranged. Prior to arranging, remove all the leaves below the water line. Fill your sink or a bucket with water then submerge your clippers or knife in the water and cut at least one inch off the bottom of the stem. Immediately place the roses in a vase, making sure to remove any leaves below the water line. After arranging, if possible, place the arrangement in a cool, dark room for 2-3 hours.

March

Plants for sunny areas

Annuals- Alyssum,Bachelor's Button, Blanket Flowers, Calliopsis, Dianthus, Floss Flower, Marigold, Nasturtium, Sweet Pea, Zinnia

Perennials- Baby's Breath, Bellflower, Blue Pincushion Flower, Candytuft, Carnation, Cottage Pinks, Daisy, Lavender, Lupine, Pasqueflower, Rose, White Coneflower, Yarrow

Herbs- Agrimony, Apple Mint, Cardamon, Chamomile, Chive, Coriander, Dill, Horehound, Perrmint, Sweet Bay, Tarragon, Thyme

Ground Covers- Bishop's Weed, Blue Bugle, Blue Juniper, Cotoneaster, Creeping Phlox, Crown Vetch, Red Sedum Creeper, Snow-in-summer, Speedwell

Bulbs- Crocus, Daffodil, Gladiolus, Hyacinth, Iris, Lilly, Tulip

April

Plants for shady areas

Annuals- Amethyst Flower, Baby-blue eyes, Balsam, Coleus, Flowering Tobacco, Forget-me-not, Impatiens, Lobelia, Monkey Flower, Pansy, Patience Plant, Wax Begonia

Perennials- Astilbe, Bleeding-heart, Columbine, Cranesbill, Fuchsia, Heartleaf Bergenia, Hosta, Jacob's-ladder, Knotweed, Lady's Mantle, Phlox, Red Turtlehead

Herbs- Angelica, Catnip, Chervil, Chicory, Foxglove, Ginseng, Hyssop, Lemon Grass, Mint, Parsley, Rosemary

Ground Covers- Baltic Ivy, Carpet Bugle, Dusty Miller, Evergreen Vinca, Ferns, Lamium, Pachysandra, Periwinkle, Silver Archangel

Shrubs- Azlea, Boxwood, Camellia, Clematis, Fothergilla, Holly, Hydrangea, Yew

May

Long blooming flowers

Blanket flower, Bleeding-heart, Bellflower, Coreopsis, Day lillies, Geranium or crane bill, Purple loosestrife, Salvia, Sedum, Veronica

June

Favorite Flowers to Attract Butterflies and Hummingbirds

Annuals- Black-eyed susan, Blood flower, Canna, Cardinal flower, Columbine, Firespike, Fuchsia, Impatiens, Jacobiana, Penstemon, Petunia, Spider flower, Shrimp plant, Sunflower, Tassel flower, Yellow cosmos, Zinnia

Perennials- Anise hyssop, Bee balm (monarda), Butterflyweed, Corabells, Four O'Clocks, Foxglove, Hosta, Lantana, Lillies, Purple coneflower, Salvia, Sage, Verbene banariensis

Shurbs- Butterfly bush, Flame acanthus, Sweet pepperbush, Turk's cap, Weigela

Vines- Honeysuckle vine, Morning Glory, Passion vine, Trumpet vine

July

Plumerias (frangipani) the sweetly scent plant

Tropical in origin, known as the "leis flowers," fast easy to grow, pest-resistant, colorful, sweet fragrant long lasting blooms.
Basic needs - regular watering with a phosphorous fertilizer and full sun. Use blossom booster for more bloom. Needs well drained soil that contains organic matter, blood meal, bone meal, peat, and compost. Will tolerate soil pH ranges from neutral to slightly alkaline. To avoid excessive growth use very little nitrogen.

 

August

Types of interior plants

Indoor plants, also called houseplants, are divided into four categories

Foliage Plants- also called green plants prefer indirect lighting, moist soil but not wet,and temperatures between 65 to 80 degrees

Flowering Plants-also called blooming plants are usually purchased mature and already blooming. Most blooming plants are not suited for continued indoor living and should be moved outdoors after blooming

Cacti- very tolerant plants prefer a sunny window, highly porous well-drained soil, watering occasionally. Cacti do not have leaves

Succulents- succulents are similar to cacti, storing water in their stems and leaves. Succulents prefer porous well-drained soil, lots of sun, good air circulation and plenty of water. During the winter, succulents must go dormant in a cool, dry environment.

 

December

Poinsettia

WARNING: Avoid chilling or bruising...

Purchase when bracts are full, colorful but before the yellow centers are evident.

Poinsettia plants are sometimes referred to as poisonous. Research has shown they are not harmful to humans or animals, but avoid ingesting them..

When all red bracts fall, store with only occasional watering till warm weather. Plant outside (facing south) after cutting stems to about 8 inches.

Bring indoors before frost.

Very difficult to rebloom...needs 8 weeks of 14 hours of darkness each night.

 


 


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